Saturday, June 26, 2010

Lela Stankovic - Scottish Castle



Artist: Lela Stankovic
Medium: Pencil and Charcoal drawing on paper
Size: 11.5" x 8.5"

Artist's blog: http://www.lelacreations.blogspot.com/
Artist's web site: http://www.lelacreations.com/

7 comments:

Lela Stankovic said...

For this painting challenge I had divided oppinions among my non-artist friends. Half of them did not like the photo. The other half loved it. I was thinking what was wrong with it? You just need to balance darks in foreground add a few more clouds, replace the building with something more charming, ... Then I realized ... they look at the photo as is ... not my vision of it ... and that is where we artists are so different. I decided to test "my vision of it in a value study drawing ... and see what others think.

Angela said...

Oh My! When I returned to visit this blog I thought I was on the wrong page. What an interpetation of the reference photo. That is what art is all about. I love it. It does show the individuality of each artist. I love the clouds and the mysterious feel of it. Also the grass in the foreground is just right. A big thumbs up.

Paula Reynolds said...

Next to your triumph of art my acrylic looks pathetic! I'm in awe of your talent!!!!!

Margaret Bednar said...

WOW.

Lela Stankovic said...

Thanks so much for such kind and encouraging words Angela and Paula and Margaret!

Paula your painting has a charm of its own and I love it very much also. Each of our works is interesting and unique though based on the same reference. One of my friends says that he enjoys viewing each painting in each of the PADT challenge even though all of them are based on the same reference. Its so interesting that each individual artist's imagination and creativity can weave such a unique magic with colors, light and shade and simple things.

Nancie Johnson said...

I agree with everyone on this, this piece of work is a knock-out. Wonderful work.

Byannick said...

You know how to use values with charcoal.

Well done. I like very much how you bent the lake to force the eyes to go to the tower.