Sunday, May 9, 2010

Chandni Valiathan - Tulip Portrait


(After - second version)

(Before - first version)

Artist: Chandni Valiathan
Medium: Watercolor on paper
Size: 9"x12"

Artist's blog: http://chandnivaliathan-paintings.blogspot.com/

6 comments:

byannick said...

Hi Chandni,
Neat idea this half-half playcard style.

Suggestion - a bit more values on the petals (?)

Superb leaf and stem.

Chandni said...

Yes, I was thinking the same thing.
The actual painting has more color and shades on the petals, but somehow, when I took a picture of it, it came out too light. Any suggestions on how to better capture my painting in a digital format?

Jasmine said...

Very beautiful painting and I love the choice of colors. The colors give the painting an exotic flavor.

I would love to know the answer to Chandni's question as well - How to better capture paintings in a digital format?

Byannick said...

Soft (north or in shadow) natural light and not too close, the Numerics are not eyes and they grab every lttle detail (defaults too) :(

Then using image software, tune Brightness and/or contrast to match the original (yeah; an other training for artist's eyes )

Lela Stankovic said...

Chandni, your painting is a perfect decorating match for any home design. Color harmony and creative background are very pleasing. As a beautiful decoration I hardly can see any need for a change. As a painting, try to think about “areal prospective” and how to communicate three dimensional space.

Regarding how to take a photo of your art here are general guidelines. Choose natural bright day light or similar artificial one. Any normal house light bulbs are not appropriate (they have too much yellow). A covered north balcony or some other shaded area on a sunny day is appropriate chooice. Avoid direct sun light. Position your painting flat and far enough to be able to zoom with a camera. This will significantly reduce distortion caused by camera lenses and unify colors. Minor computer software adjustments might be needed to make it as close to the original painting as possible. This heavily depends on the quality of the camera used and monitor color adjustments.

Mark Jarvis said...

You made the painting come alive with your changes Chandni. Very nice.